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It’s Good to Be a Kid

It’s never too late to have a happy childhood. When you watch children playing, notice how totally involved they are in what they’re doing, how they run everywhere they go. Notice how they are oblivious to future problems almost as if they have given themselves permission to be free and they show it by becoming totally absorbed in their play. To be more childlike, you don’t have to give up being an adult. The fully integrated person is capable of being both an adult and a child simultaneously. Recapture the childlike feelings of wide-eyed excitement, spontaneous appreciation, cutting loose, and being full of awe and wonder at this magnificent universe.

Here’s what kids know how to do best:

Laugh!

The child in you, like all children, loves to laugh, to be around people who can laugh at themselves and life. Children instinctively know that the more laughter we have in our lives, the better. They will go out of their way to linger with anyone who makes them laugh, who can go along with their jokes.

Keep Fantasy Alive

Children love to dream, to make up stories, use their imaginations—and so would you if you’d let yourself. Remember how you loved to draw, make up verses, or songs, hear stories, make up your own games, wander aimlessly into your fantasy excursions with anyone who was willing to listen or participate? That rich fantasy life was not only great fun but also one of the healthiest aspects of your life as a whole. All of life’s best realities start with “childlike” fantasies.

Be Spontaneous

Notice how children are willing to try anything on a moment’s notice. The child inside you wants to be impulsive and adventuresome, without always having to plan things in advance. Spontaneity is in many ways the key to all childlike behavior. That ability to stop suddenly by the roadside when something interesting catches your eye leads directly to childlike immediacy and “wonder in the face of the world.”

Accept the World as It Is (Be Trusting)

When the infant comes into the world, it has no thought that the world can or should be any different from what it is. The infant just opens its eyes in wonder and fascination at what is out there and makes its way in that world as best it can. The child inside of you knows how to take things as they come, how to deal most effectively and happily with everything and everyone it encounters on this planet. If you can recapture that childlike essence of your being you can stay “forever young at heart.”

These glorious childlike qualities that can help you enjoy your life each and every day are no further from you than your fingers are from your hands. They are an inalienable part of you. If you really love that child within you, and really care to be a child again in the ways I’m talking about, you cannot help but be at peace with yourself.

When you have inner peace, you can do just about anything. Give yourself more of that childlike inner peace today, by letting yourself be that spontaneous, in-the-moment, fun-loving child again. Or, as Friedrich Schiller put it, “Keep true to the dreams of thy youth.”

FILED UNDER: wayne dyer, childhood, spontaneity, present moment, laughter, wonder, awe, appreciation, awareness, acceptance, fantasy, imagination, dreams

The Power of I Am

Throughout life you’ve been through a conditioning process that’s created a mind-set overflowing with I am nots. As a schoolchild with a less than satisfactory grade on your report card, you thought to yourself, I am not smart. You place anywhere other than number one and say, I am not talented. You feel criticized and believe that I am not good. You look in the mirror and compare yourself to a glamorous movie idol or homecoming queen and tell yourself, I am not attractive. Your relationship fractures and you think, I am unloved or I am unworthy. These, and many more like them, are repeated throughout your developmental years and into adulthood, and become your core defining self-concept.

Overcoming this I am not mentality begins with trusting your inner world of spirit. There are no boundaries restricting your inner world. But your worldview and your self-concept in the outer world are defined by your five senses. The outer world is always changing, which, by our definition, means it is not real. This awareness that what remains unchanging is the only reality could lead you to experiencing a majestic wake-up call right here, right now.

Run through as large an inventory as you can of the things that you would like to define your life. Then make the shift in your imagination from an I am not or I am hoping to become to I am. You want what follows I am to be congruent with your highest self, which is God. Beginning with your inner dialogue, simply change the words that define your concept of yourself. Redefine your self-concept by choosing the words that you opt to place into your imagination. Try this rewording of your inner world as a beginning step to accessing the assistance of your higher self and fulfilling your desires.

Instead of I am incapable of getting a job, shift to I am capable. Similarly, replace proclamations of I am not able to live in peace with I am peace. I am unlucky in love is replaced by I am love. I am unworthy of happiness becomes I am happiness. The words I am, which you consistently use to define who you are and what you are capable of, are holy expressions for the name of God—the highest aspect of yourself. Break lifelong habits of unwittingly besmirching this holy name. Discontinue using pejorative labels to cast aspersions on your holy self. Always make your very first consideration the honoring of your Divine spirit. This will allow you to rise to previously unimagined heights. Teach your outer self to accept the unlimited power of your inner spirit and the things you place in your imagination can become true for you.

FILED UNDER: wayne dyer, god, highest self, self esteem, self-image, i am, manifesting, wishes fulfilled, positivity

The Spirit of Detroit

This November I have a speaking engagement at historic Cobo Center in my native city of Detroit, Michigan. You’ve heard me talk about my early years growing up in the Detroit area—from the foster homes to the university. Forty-two years ago, when Cobo Center was called Cobo Hall, I received my doctorate from Wayne State University in this same downtown events center on the banks of the Detroit River. Even though I was born in Detroit and used to tell my kids that Wayne State was named after me, I’m really only a humble observer of this great American city.

Albert Cobo, who gave his name to the center where I’ll be speaking, was mayor of Detroit when I was a kid. One of my first jobs was distributing flyers about Albert Cobo to the houses in my neighborhood. As for Wayne State University and Wayne County where Detroit is located, both were named for the Revolutionary War general known as “Mad Anthony” Wayne. My kids actually believed my story about the university being my namesake—at least for a while!

From motorcars to music, Detroit has always been a town for innovation and creativity. Now, after decades of economic upheaval, I have heard stories of native Detroiters returning home to help rebuild the city. Empty houses are turning into artists’ studios and empty lots where houses once stood are becoming community gardens. This is love in action. A community is a network of people—family, friends, neighbors—whose lives are connected by shared presence. Love connects us and builds the kind of spirit that we will have with us always.

Lately, I’ve had occasion to think about my connection to Detroit—my brother Dave’s wonderful book about our early years there and the celebration of my mother Hazel’s life, much of it spent living and working in the Detroit area. In November, Dave will be with me at Cobo Center as well as my daughter, Skye. How many other friends and family members will be present in our evening community? If you can make it, I’d love to see you there. I don’t get to Michigan very often these days so this will be a memorable night.

FILED UNDER: wayne dyer, david dyer, skye dyer, family, community, cobo center, detroit, albert cobo

How Do You Sleep?

Metaphysical teacher Neville Goddard offers us this description of what takes place while we sleep: Sleep is the door through which the conscious, waking mind passes to be creatively joined to the subconscious. Sleep conceals the creative act while the objective world reveals it. In sleep man impresses the subconscious with his conception of himself.

Each night as I drift off to sleep, I adamantly refuse to use this precious time to review anything that I do not want to be reinforced in the hours of being immersed in my subconscious mind. I choose to impress upon my subconscious mind, and therefore the mind of God to which I am eternally joined, my conception of myself as a Divine creator in alignment with the one mind. I groggily reiterate my I ams, which I have placed in my imagination, and I remember that my slumber will be dominated by my last waking concept of myself. I am peaceful, I am content, I am love, I am writing, I am the governing power of the universe, and I attract only to myself those who are in alignment with my highest ideals of myself.

This is my nightly ritual, always resisting any temptation to go over any fear or unpleasantness that my ego might be asking me to review. I assume the feeling in my body of those I am statements already fulfilled, and I enter my sleep inviting the instruction that my subconscious mind welcomes. I know that I’m allowing myself to be programmed while asleep, for the next day I rise knowing that I am a free agent. I understand that every action and event of the day is essentially predetermined by my feelings as I prepared for sleep, and while I was in that place of warmth and trust in the arms of the one universal subconscious mind.

Here are some suggestions for your own bedtime routine:

— As you lie in bed preparing for your nightly slumber, remember that the last thought you have in your mind can last up to four hours in your subconscious mind. That’s four hours of programming from just one moment of contemplation prior to going into your unconscious state. Create a reminder like a prayer or mantra to place by your bed. Write these words and read them as you get comfortable: I am going to use these moments to review what I intend to manifest into my life. Keep that sign there to remind you how to spend your pre-sleep moments nightly.

—If before dropping off to sleep you are assailed by worry, distress, or fear, do not stay in bed. Get up, turn on the light, take a few deep breaths, read from a spiritual text, meditate for a few moments in front of a white candle, say a prayer—do anything other than staying there lying down. You cannot defend yourself against these onslaughts while remaining snug in your bed. If distressing feelings come back when you return to bed, get up, turn on the lights, and try something else. When you finally do feel peaceful back in bed, repeat your loving I ams and drift off to sleep ready to have your ears opened and your instructions sealed.

FILED UNDER: wayne dyer, neville goddard, sleep, conciousness, subconscious mind, manifestation, creativity, bedtime routine

Thanks for the Love

Thank you, thank you, for all the kindness and prayers you’ve sent our way at the passing of my mother, Hazel Irene Dyer, on Sunday, July 22. Although Mom had been in a coma for two days, on the 22nd she seemed to be waiting for my brother Jim and his wife, Marilyn, to arrive. Soon after they entered her room, she somehow knew it was okay to let go and her heart stopped beating.

Jim and Marilyn have shown what it means to be God-realized people in the last 5 or 6 years. They have dedicated their lives to reaching out and serving—first in caring for Marilyn’s mom and then for our mom, Hazel. Jim and Marilyn are amazing souls; they are angels. I have enormous respect for that kind of service. As Lao-tzu said, our original nature is gentleness and kindness and reaching out to others. Ram Dass has told me many times that the grandest achievement of his life was taking care of his dad and stepmother during their last years.

Three of my kids were here with me in Hawaii when we got the news about Mom’s passing. The kids organized a Hawaiian-style ceremony for us. Sands, Sommer, Saje, Mira, and I put some candles and flowers on boogie boards and paddled out into the ocean at sunset. We went out about 100 yards from shore and formed a circle. Although it’s usually quite rough out there, this evening the water was totally calm.

“Grama’s at work here,” said Sands. Each of us shared a remembrance of Mom. After about half an hour, we let the flowers float on out to sea and paddled back in.

John Quincy Adams, 7th U.S. President, wrote this the day before he died: “John Quincy Adams is well, but the house in which he lives at the present time is becoming dilapidated. It’s tottering on its foundations. Time and the seasons have nearly destroyed it. Its roof is pretty well worn out. Its walls are much shattered and tremble with every wind. I think John Quincy Adams will have to move out of it soon. But he, himself, he himself is quite well, quite well.”

I can’t tell you how many conversations my mother and I had about death. We always talked very openly about it—never pretending that our bodies are not going to wear out and die. All that comes into the material world dematerializes—that’s just the nature of creation. Now Mother is free of all pain. She is in the mystery of all that we wonder about. Now she knows what’s on the other side. That is something we all will discover someday.

And so again, thank you for all the love you’ve sent to me and my family these past weeks. Thank you, Mom, for all your love. I love you always.

FILED UNDER: wayne dyer, death, dying, the other side, family, ram dass, lao-tzu, hawaiian custom, end of life, funeral

Summers in Sombra

There’s a new book in the family and I love it dearly. My big brother Dave has written a heartfelt and healing memoir that begins with our early childhood together and carries him into the present day. From Darkness to Light is filled with discoveries and insights, sorrows and triumphs. Dave decided not to “die with his music still in him” by waking up the writing gift he had long suppressed. Here’s a summer memory from our childhood that I hope you will enjoy as much as I have:

“While living in foster care in Mt. Clemens, Michigan, Wayne and I didn’t get to see Mother or our older brother Jim very often—certainly not often enough. One reason was that Mother didn’t drive and had no way of getting to us. The separation of our family tore at her heart. Mother worked at Chrysler, earning the typical female wage for whatever job she was doing. In those days, men made almost double the wages paid to females for the same job. My mother’s greatest wish was to somehow reunite her family again. With this in mind, she finally decided to marry Bill Drury, a fellow she’d been dating for a couple of years.

Bill’s mother Cora owned a cottage in Sombra, Ontario. I remember all of us going there in the summer of 1948. For Wayne and me, it was as if we were visiting some kind of Fantasy Island. We’d swim, fish, play baseball, listen to ballgames on the radio, and even learn to play pinochle.

Jim and Wayne seemed able to swim right away, but it didn’t come easy for me. Although I enjoyed just being in the water, swimming wasn’t one of my favorite sports or pastimes. It did bother me that my little brother Wayne, who was a year and a half younger than me, could swim circles around me. He, of course, would never brag or say anything to make me feel bad.

A half a mile down the road from the cottage was the river access where we swam. If we dove off the dock, the water was deep and over our heads. If we swam straight out about fifty feet, we’d reach the sand bar where the water was only waist high. Jim and Wayne would dive in, and within seconds, they’d be standing on the sand bar. There was no
way I could swim fifty feet, so I’d dive in and get out right away. So much for swimming!

Other summer memories include watching the magnificent fireworks display on the Fourth of July, cutting the grass with a push mower, and playing baseball. Wayne and I played catch whenever we could. We’d even watch the local Sombra baseball team practice and run the bases for them. Jim met a girl named Ethyl that summer, so he was always preoccupied with her. Wayne and I were inseparable.

One afternoon, Wayne and I discovered a nearby gas station run by a guy named Bill. Whenever the Tigers games aired on the radio, we’d head over to the gas station and listen to the game. We pretty much had free rein that summer. Mother, Bill, Cora, and Bill’s cousin Margaret seemed to play pinochle at the cottage day and night.”

Excerpted from From Darkness to Light by David L. Dyer. Copyright ©2012 (Balboa Press).

FILED UNDER: wayne dyer, david dyer, family, summer vacation, memories, childhood

Without a Doubt

Abraham Maslow spent a good part of his adult life researching and writing about the idea of self-actualization. He described the small percentage of people he called “self-actualizing” as living at the extraordinary level of consciousness. I vividly recall Dr. Maslow’s assertion that one of the highest qualities these self-actualizers possess is the inclination to be independent of the good opinion of others.

I’m deeply attracted to this idea of living extraordinarily—independent of the good opinion of others—stressing it in many of the books and recordings I’ve produced, starting in 1971. Dr. Maslow passed away on June 8, 1970, the same day I received my doctorate degree—I’ve often felt that in some mystical way, he was passing the baton to me.

One of Dr. Maslow’s most significant attributes of living a self-actualized life is self-trust. When you trust yourself to decide your destiny, you don’t allow externals to discourage or influence you. You have faith, and faith is attained through complete trust and confidence in the power of the one universal mind, which you are inextricably a part of. It is the God-realized you that placed the thoughts and feelings that represent your destiny into your mind and body.

One of the reasons I’m able to write about the hidden power of manifestation buried deep within each of us is that during childhood I unconsciously practiced these ideas while in foster homes—and they simply became a part of who I am. Throughout my life I’ve been labeled “stubborn,” “obsessive,” “headstrong,” and “unyielding” when it comes to what I have in my imagination and seeing it become my physical reality.

In order to manifest you must assume the feeling of the wish fulfilled. You must be able to feel it in your body long before your senses are aware of it. Your inner pictures and the corresponding feelings that are connected to your vision belong only to you, and you begin to treat this inner world of thoughts and feelings as sacred territory. You make the shift from believing to knowing, and what you absolutely know is not tinged with doubt.

With my recent diagnosis of leukemia, I’ve done precisely what I’m writing about, in the same way that I have for my entire life, concerning my own fate and my own well-being. What I know for certain is that there’s an emotional component to every illness. I view my elevated white-blood-cell count as part of my body employing its God-realized intelligence to heal whatever damage I’ve caused by participating in psychologically traumatic activities, particularly in my relationships with loved ones.

So rather than cursing my body’s innate wisdom, I am in a profound state of gratitude for all that has come my way, including these elevated blood-cell counts. The more I assume the feeling of my I am well; I am strong assertions in my imagination, the more the universe seems to send me the right information and the right people to assist me in living a wishes fulfilled life.

FILED UNDER: wayne dyer, self-actualization, self-trust, faith, beliefs, imagination, manifesting, destiny, gratitude

My Greatest Teacher

I’m 72 today. Around the time of my birthday last year, I was privileged to be working on a new film project from Hay House called My Greatest Teacher. The story is based on my experience at my father’s grave in Biloxi, Mississippi in 1974. It was a moment of forgiveness that turned my whole life around and changed everything—from my writing to my career to my relationships. I stopped drinking and doing so many things that were debilitating to my body. In that moment, I got rid of the anger and rage against my father that I had carried around inside of me since I was a child.

The film has a contemporary setting with an actor playing the young me—angry, impatient, careless of the feelings of others—until he faces his greatest teacher. Essentially, he can’t go on with his life until he settles up with the huge burden of blame he is carrying. A Course in Miracles says, “If you didn’t blame, there would be nothing to forgive.” That’s important to remember. We get to stages in our life where we’re blaming other people for our unhappiness and our pain and our hurts. If we stopped blaming, where might we be? Ram Dass once said to me, “Who is anybody to forgive anyone else?” If we must forgive, we must first have blamed. To forgive is to stop blaming and to accept with compassion that everyone is simply doing the best they can given the conditions of their life and what they have to work with at the time.

Forgiveness sets you free to move past the pain and on into a life of loving and serving. The satisfying and fulfilling life you know is there for you. My Greatest Teacher does a fine job of portraying the turnaround that comes when a man stops nursing his own wounds and looks around to see who else needs the gifts of love and healing he was born to give.

FILED UNDER: wayne dyer, film-making, forgiveness, blame, a course in miracles, anger

Faith Affirming

Faith is the complete reliance on the power and goodness of Spirit and the firm belief that you are always connected to this goodness. Always affirm your faith and not your doubt. When you affirm that things might not work out, that your troubles continue to mount, that your problems are insoluble, that God has not been listening, or that you are powerless in the face of so many struggles, you are affirming doubt rather than faith. The ability to know faith and affirm it allows it to manifest in your life.

In John 14:27, Jesus said, “My peace I give to you.” This is an affirmation of faith. He certainly wasn’t suggesting that peace is very difficult to have and you must struggle for it. Jesus brought peace to everyone by affirming it. Likewise, in his healing work, he didn’t imply that we haven’t been having a great deal of success lately with leprosy, but if you listen to me you have a thirty percent chance of surviving over the next five years. Instead, he declared, “You are well,” affirming faith at the highest spiritual level, and healing took place.

You too must learn to affirm your faith in the face of doubt with thoughts that things will work out, things will improve. Think, write, and say affirmations like these:

I intend to create prosperity.

I’ll do what is necessary to eradicate this problem.

I know I am not alone.

I have faith that all is for good.

I give no energy to the negative because I know all is in divine order.

I will consult with God and know that I will be guided to do what is needed.

These are all affirmations of faith, which, when practiced, will permit you to say “no” to doubt and “yes” to life.

FILED UNDER: wayne dyer, faith, affirmations, problem solving, spirit, peace, healing, doubt

Pure Love

I have been deeply and profoundly touched by the contents of a new book coming out from Hay House this month. For more than four years, an advancing cancer brought Anita Moorjani to death’s doorstep and beyond—inside the house of death itself. Anita has described it all in great detail in this soul-searching book, Dying to Be Me. I encourage you to read it very carefully and thoughtfully with a mind that’s open to having many of your cherished beliefs challenged, especially about what lies beyond this world, in what’s often called the hereafter.

Surrounded by loved ones and a medical team anticipating her last breath at any moment, Anita lay in a deep coma. Yet she was given the opportunity to return to her cancer-ravaged body, defying all odds, and experience incredible healing—through the vehicle of unconditional love. More than this, she was allowed to return from the chamber of death and report to all of us what life on the other side of this corporeal world looks like—and of even more significance, feels like.

This is a love story—a big, unconditional love story that will give you a renewed sense of who you truly are, why you’re here, and how you can transcend any fear and self-rejection that defines your life. Anita speaks with uncommon candor about her cancer, explaining why she believes she had to go down this treacherous road in her life, why she feels she was healed, and why she returned. Her life’s mission is in a very big way reflected in the fact that you’re about to read her report of this experience. Her story has had a profound effect not only on me, but also on my children and my 95-year-old mother, who found in it a healing message of love, hope, and peace regarding what lies ahead for us all.

Anita spoke of the sense that we’re all pure love. We’re not only connected to everyone else and to God, but at a deeper level, we all are God. We’ve allowed our fears and ego to edge God out of our lives, which has much to do with all of the disease not only in our bodies, but in our world as well. She spoke of learning to treasure our magnificence and live as beings of light and love, and of the healing properties inherent in such a mind-set.

While I was writing my new book Wishes Fulfilled, Anita Moorjani came into my life as if to place an exclamation point on all that I was receiving and recording. She lived it and said it so beautifully—and now you’re blessed to be able to read and apply all that Anita came to know in her furious bout with advanced cancer, and her tranquil journey back through the direct experience of Divine healing.

May you take Anita’s words and become an instrument of removing any and all disease from your body, your relationships, your country, and our world. As Elizabeth Barrett Browning once observed poetically: “Earth’s crammed with heaven, and every common bush afire with God.” Indeed, healing and heaven on Earth are yours for the loving.
Enjoy Anita’s wonderful, wonderful book. I love it, and I love her.

FILED UNDER: wayne dyer, anita moorjani, death, near death experience, dying, heaven, divine healing, life mission, oneness

Wishes Fulfilled

Last fall I had the great privilege of filming my ninth fundraising special for PBS. The show will arrive this month on your local public television station and I hope you’ll join me for an in-depth look at “Wishes Fulfilled: Mastering the Art of Manifesting.” Not only will you see me wearing those new shoes I mentioned here in December, but you’ll meet Anita Moorjani, the incredible young woman whose story of her near-death experience will turn your world around.

Anita’s story, beautifully told in her new book Dying to Be Me, has taught me what death really means, and just how much lies beyond our sensory reality. I’ve been sharing Anita’s story with just about everyone who’ll listen since I first discovered it. One person I was most eager to share it with is my 95-year-old mother.  And it’s been a wonderful source of comfort to a lady who has breakfast every morning with friends who might not still be around by dinner time. As Jesus said, “Be at peace.” We can trust that we come from God. Our reality is divine.

This ability to feel and to trust in our divine connection is exactly the key to manifesting, your “wishes fulfilled.” We can develop this ability to trust despite the absence of physical evidence as perceived by our senses. No matter the circumstances or obstacles, draft your dream and the way can be cleared. Trust your divine connection, know that your soul has no limits and the universe responds and works with you to manifest that idea into a physical reality. It has always worked that way for me.

Even as a child, and certainly against all odds given my background, I imagined myself speaking to large crowds. As a college student sitting in classrooms, I visualized myself working to transform lives, being uplifting and empowering to audiences around the world. All that time, I had nothing but a dream to work with—in foster homes, in the U.S. Navy, and in college. Feel the connection, focus on what you have to give, have faith in your dreams, and you will overcome all doubt and make your wishes reality.

FILED UNDER: wayne dyer, pbs, anita moorjani, near death experience, wishes fulfilled, manifesting, faith, trust, divine

Just Imagine

Your imagination is your own fertile field for growing any seedlings that you choose to plant for a future harvest.

You may have been told that you have always been a dreamer, as if this were a fault. I can speak here from experience. Family, friends, teachers, and even advisors frequently disparaged ideas that burned brightly in my imagination. I often heard comments such as, “Wayne, you’re such a dreamer. Get real. You are never going to make it as a writer, or a television performer, or a movie personality. Be realistic—we know what’s best for you.”

When I was being discharged from the Navy at the age of 22, my superiors warned me that starting college at my “advanced age” was loaded with uncertainty, particularly since I had no higher education experience, and I would be competing with younger recent high school graduates. Since I already had a skill as a cryptographer in the Navy, they advised me to pursue what they felt was best for me. But I had a dream—an imagination filled with the idea of teaching, writing, and speaking to large audiences. I saw myself onstage. I saw myself as a prominent author. And this vision could not and would not be sabotaged by someone else’s vision of what I should or could become.

As a young boy in a foster home, I almost always ignored other people’s ideas about what I should be thinking or doing—I simply was indifferent to their opinions regarding what I could imagine for myself. I have carried this kind of inner discipline regarding my own imagination with clarity, refusing to allow external opinions to cancel or diminish what for me was hallowed ground.

Not long ago, others advised me that acting in a movie was not sensible for me as a 68-year-old man with no acting experience. I once again remembered to hang the DO NOT DISTURB sign at the entrance to my imagination, and proceeded to take acting lessons and adopt the self-enforced regimen that allowed me to create a movie. It is a product that fills me with pride today—all because I have diligently practiced the following rule:

Never, and I mean never, allow anyone else’s ideas of who you can or can’t become sully your dream or pollute your imagination. This is your territory, and a KEEP OUT sign is a great thing to erect at all entrances to your imagination.

Stay in a state of grace and gratitude for this resplendent gift that is always yours to do with as you choose.

FILED UNDER: wayne dyer, imagination, dreams, faith, beliefs, aspirations, self-esteem

Dancing with God

Everyone knows the experience of “performance anxiety” whether you are a prima ballerina or a job candidate or a student taking a qualifying exam. Life is filled with what we think of as performance challenges.  The key word here is think because it’s really our thinking about these experiences that scares us—not the opportunity to show what we can do. 

A way out of the “I’m scared” thought pattern is offered in A Course in Miracles. I have a special love for this weighty tome that tells us there are only two emotions we can experience: love and fear. Anything that is love cannot be fear, and anything that is fear cannot be love. If we can find our way to stay in a space of love, then fear is an impossibility.

Franklin D. Roosevelt’s famous refrain from his first inaugural address, “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself,” was crafted from Thoreau’s observation that “nothing is so much to be feared as fear.” These Tao men had it right—there really is nothing to be afraid of. We have no need to fear and we can accomplish anything for the simple reason that we are never alone. The presence of our all-loving Source banishes fear.

When you face a “performance” that might provoke the “I’m scared” response, choose love and approach your opportunity as a chance to dance with God. It’s more fun than Dancing with the Stars! Bring your highest Self to the occasion, your loving, serving, giving, joyful self, and be prepared to show the world what your God-aligned Self has to offer.

FILED UNDER: wayne dyer, a course in miracles, anxiety, fear, love, franklin d. roosevelt, henry david thoreau, tao te ching, higher self, dancing with the stars

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